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214   HISTORY 01 CANADA.

from fifty to eighty-four. Liberal provision was made for the public service, but with the intimation that it would not be repeated if the reforms asked for were not conceded. In grants for public improvements the assembly was almost lavish — for docks at Montreal, for improvement of the navigation of the St. Lawrence, for lighthouses, for public buildings, for road improvement (£38,000), and for education (£8,000).

Revenues Control Act, 1831.-In 1830 Lord Aylmer became governor. A fresh election resulted in the return of many English-speaking members, some of whom were on the popular side. In the matter of reform in the legislative council, Iiempt had reported against any organic change. He suggested merely that a few independent members should be added—one or two of them from the popular party. The assembly, in the spirit of the report of 18.28, passed a bill to exclude judges from both councils, but the legislative council rejected it. This, apparently, led the assembly to take a firm stand against settling the Civil List until the reform in the council had been carried out. ; In 1 i1 the necessary Imperial Act was passed to transfer ntrol of~ provincial revenues (except the casual and territo al) to the provincial assembly. The colonial office, how-ever, insisted that before assent could be given to any provincial bill to Appropriate these revenues, a Civil List should be voted which wdAaald place about £26,000 per annum' at the disposal of the execu vie. At the same time, the legislative council was changed ; ce •ainly for the better, though the executive still controlled a clear majority.

A Division in the Reform Ranks.—At this point, a difference of opinion showed itself clearly in the reform ranks. The extremists, headed by Papineau, and forming a majority in the assembly, insisted upon a full measure of reform at once. The moderate wing, headed by Neilson, and comprising a number of influential French-Canadians, favored the immediate acceptance of the Crown's offer. They urged that such a large measure of control over the revenues would enable the assembly to enforce reform from within the province, instead of taking it as a boon from the Imperial authorities. The extremists, however, declined to yield ; and the contest with the executive and the colonial office became at once decidedly bitter.


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