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208   HISTORY OF CANADA.

oppression and rendering it difficult for humble suitors to obtain justice. The assembly (1814) sustained Stuart and voted funds to pay his expenses to England to support the charges before the colonial office. The legislative council threw out the item. They also rejected a bill passed by the assembly to appoint a permanent agent for the province in London. This bill was passed almost annually by the assembly and as regularly rejected by the legislative council, who took the ground that the governor was the only proper channel of communication between the province and the home authorities. There was thus a one-sided investigation by the colonial secretary into the charges against the judges, and they were acquitted of all wrong-doing. When a message to this effect was communicated to the assembly by Sir Gordon Drummond, much dissatisfaction was expressed. Drummond thereupon dissolved parliament, with an expression of regret that after the decision of the colonial office the assembly should "again enter on the discussion."

Papineau—Neilson.—In 1815 the newly-elected assembly chose as its speaker a young man, twenty-six years old, who was

destined to take a foremost place in the history of his province—Louis Joseph Papineau. He had a hand-some face and a striking figure ; and, through his fiery eloquence, he soon became the idol of his compatriots. For many years he had associated with him in the assembly the warm-hearted Scotchman to whom reference has frequently been made—John Neil-son. Papineau was impatient for immediate reform of all abuses. Neilson, equally earnest for reform, had greater

political sagacity, and was content to

advance stop by step. For many years Lours JOSEPH FAPI\EAU. they worked together, until finally,   .-when Papineau declined to accept concessions from the colonial office because they did not, in his opinion, go far enough, Neilson withdrew his support, and Papineau rushed into rebellion.

Sherbrooke Conciliatory.—In 1816 Sir J. C. Sherbrooke

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