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174   HISTORY OF CANADA.

northern bank of the little river, de Salaberry chose his position, and, having made all necessary arrangements, awaited Hampton's coining. The Canadian forces were a mere handful—Voltigeurs, Fencibles, a few regulars, and a score of Indians—but the position was well taken, and de Salaberry was a host in himself. The attack was made on the 26th of October, and the action lasted

for several hours. De Salaberry's ruse of the bugles is often mentioned. By scattering his buglers through the woods he impressed upon the enemy the idea that they were opposed by a numerous force. An attack upon de Salaberry's rear by way of a ford on the river was

f1 repulsed ; the plain body of the

Americans on the north bank were unable to force the position in front of them; and finally Hampton withdrew his entire army. The whole affair was after-wards spoken of by one who took part in it as a farce, so completely was the attacking force deceived. None the less, however, must be

CHATEAUGUAY MONUMENT.   the praise bestowed upon the

Canadian militia for their steady defence of their position against such overwhelming odds. Hampton, apparently satisfied that he could make no headway against such vigorous opposition, withdrew his army to winter-quarters.

Chrysler's Farm.—About this time General Wilkinson was on his way down the St. Lawrence with a large force. General de Rottenberg, at this time in command of the British troops in Upper Canada, was at Kingston, where during all the summer an attack had been expected. Learning of Wilkinson's embarkation upon the river, he sent a detachment of troops under Colonel Morrison to harass the rear of the American army. A strong body from the latter, under General Boyd, had landed upon the Canadian shore below Prescott. At Chrysler's Farm, some distance above Cornwall, Morrison overtook the enemy,

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