Previous The History of the Dominion of Canada (1897) Next

 

172   HISTORY OF CANADA.

to capture the boats, and he feared for the safety of the troops on shore. During the summer there was much manoeuvring and little fighting between the two fleets. Late in September, however, a more decisive encounter took place off York. After a hot fight, Yeo was defeated and forced to seek shelter under Burlington Heights, leaving Chauncey free to capture a fleet of transports with nearly three hundred troops on board destined for Kingston

11   hem* Q

A   SUaAns •~~

P   Naplrw/le • D   A

L   Cornwall   Laco//e•

   ,,.   is

1   Chrys/ehfa mxp-   '-' o rernanbGero~d3a'.-y

~(

 

,_. re..   pyta

c Idp

1/goons 'to

Kn•ston

Sackers Harbor

Oswego

from York. The approach of winter soon put a stop to further naval operations. The Americans, deprived of the support of the fleet, were unable to hold Fort George, and the year's operations on the Niagara frontier ended with Canadian soil intact in that quarter.

Upon the ocean the tide had turned, and the Atlantic seaboard of the United States was under an almost complete blockade. In this year took place the famous encounter off Boston harbor, between the IT. S. frigate Chesapeake and H.M.S. $hannan, in

Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture

Previous The History of the Dominion of Canada (1897) Next