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HISTORY OF' CANADA.   171

and the younger Brant, had hung upon their rear during 'the entire march. Seeing that they appeared to be undecided whether to advance or retreat, FitzGibbon rode out from the woods under a flag of truce and demanded their surrender. In terror of the Indians, and ignorant of the real strength of the British, the whole American detachment, after a brief parley, surrendered. The heroic exploit of Laura Secord and the bold stratagem of Fitz-Gibbon are among the memorable events of the war. In July, Fort Schlosser and Black Rock were captured by British troops, who, however, made no effort to hold them. Thus matters remained on the Niagara frontier until the year was nearly ended, each side maintaining a defensive attitude.

Americans Withdraw from the Niagara Frontier.—In December (the year's operations in the east having, as we shall see, resulted gloriously for the Canadians), General Drummond was sent to the Niagara frontier with instructions to take the offensive. The American general, McClure, determined to abandon Fort George, but before doing so he perpetrated an act of wanton barbarity in burning the town of. Newark (Niagara), exposing the inhabitants to the rigors of a winter night. He then withdrew to the American side. The British, exasperated by this outrage, laid waste the opposite shore from Fort Niagara to Buflhlo, capturing at different dates various positions on that side. General Drummond afterwards issued a proclamation condemning this savage warfare, justifying it only as a retaliation for McClure's brutality.

Naval Movements.—Events this year in the Niagara district had been much affected by the naval movements on Lake Ontario, where, upon the whole, the American fleet, under Commodore Chauncey, proved superior to the British fleet under Sir James Yeo. While the former was absent from Sackett's Harbor forwarding the attack upon Fort George, Sir George Prevost led in person an expedition to capture the American naval stronghold. The British fleet, under Yeo, conveyed the troops thither from Kingston. At the moment when victory seemed assured, when the enemy had set fire to their stores to prevent them from falling into the hands of the British, Prevost recalled his forces from the attack and returned to Kingston. He was alarmed, it is said, by a movement made by the enemy as if


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