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HISTORY OF CANADA.   169

turned the scale, and Captain Barclay was finally obliged to strike his flag.

Moraviantown.—General Harrison now embarked for Fort Malden. Proctor deemed it useless to attempt to hold his position at Detroit against the forces now brought against him, and therefore gathered his own troops together and retreated eastward up the Thames. He neglected, unfortunately, to destroy the bridges behind him, and Harrison overtook him near the Indian village of Moraviantown (October 5th). Proctor turned and gave battle. A cavalry charge by Kentucky woodmen broke the British line, and though Tecumseh, on the right wing, fought bravely to retrieve the disaster, the result was a decisive victory for the American troops. Tecumseh himself was slain with many of his bravest warriors. Proctor escaped with a small part of his force, the remainder being taken prisoners. Harrison returned again to Detroit, and for the remainder of the war the Americans held control of the western frontier and Lake Erie. Beyond some petty raids upon the north shore of Lake Erie, their control advanced them very little toward the conquest of Canada.

Capture of York.—During the winter and spring (1812-1813) the United States had made vigorous efforts to equip a fleet which might secure control of Lake Ontario, and thus cut off the Niagara district. Sackett's Harbor was their navy-yard, and in April a well-appointed fleet sailed out, having on board a large force under Generals Dearborn and Pike, destined for an attack upon the Upper Canadian capital, York. Major-General Sheaffe was in command of a small force of British regulars there. The Americans effected a landing (April 27th, 1813) in Humber Bay, to the west of the town, drove back those who opposed them, and, marching east-ward, captured the fort at the harbor's mouth. By an unfortunate explosion just as the final assault was about to be made, a large number on both sides were killed and many wounded. Among the latter was General Pike, who died on board ship a few hours later. Sheaffe abandoned the town and marched with his regulars for Kingston, leaving the local authorities to arrange terms of capitulation. American historians gravely assert that the American troops found hung up over the speaker's chair in the legislative assembly chamber a human scalp, which so incensed them that


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