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1G8   HISTORY OF CANADA.

operate by way of Oswego and Sackett's Harbor, and its left upon the Niagara frontier. The year was crowded with incident, and it will conduce to clearness of view to disregard the strict order of events and treat separately of the operations in each locality. And first we turn to the western frontier. General Harrison* was now in command of the Grand Army of the West. He had distinguished himself in the Indian wars, and much was expected of him in the present campaign. Proctor was still in command at Detroit. Toward the end of January Harrison despatched General Winchester to drive the British from their outposts to the south-west of Detroit. Frenchtown on the River Raisin was taken, but before Winchester had time to strengthen his position there Proctor advanced against him from Detroit and retook the post. Winchester himself was captured together with the greater part of his force. After this disaster General Harrison decided to hold his position on the Maumee until the fleet which the Americans were then fitting out at Presqu'ile could co-operate with him in an advance upon Detroit. Proctor meanwhile besieged the American fort at Sandusky, but was obliged to withdraw.

Perry Defeats Barclay on Lake Erie.—The British naval force on Lake Erie was commanded by Captain Barclay, who for a time maintained a strict watch outside Presqu'ile harbor. When the American fleet was ready to sail, it was found that the ships could not cross the harbor bar with the guns on board, and to venture out without them meant a speedy capture by Barclay. The latter, unfortunately, left his post to pay a visit to some friends on the north shore. In his absence the guns were shipped over the bar in lighters and then transferred again to the ships, which had in the meantime sailed out of the harbor. Barclay was obliged to make for the Detroit River, leaving the command of Lake Erie to Conunodore Perry and his new fleet. Proctor was thus cut off from his supplies, and, in order to reopen communication with the Niagara posts, Captain Barclay finally decided to risk an engagement. Off Put-in Bay the two fleets niet (September 10th, 1813), and an obstinate battle ensued. At one time it seemed as if the British fleet must win ; but a change of wind and a skilful manoeuvre by Commodore Perry

* Afterwards President of the United States, and grandfather of a recent President, Benjamin Harrison.


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