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164   HISTORY OF CANADA.

the regulars as could be spared from the garrisons along the Niagara frontier, proceeded by way of Lake Erie to Fort Malden. Here, too, gathered the militia from the Loyalist settlements along the north shore of Lake Erie. Hull, seeing that the tables were being turned upon him, withdrew his forces from the Canadian side of the river and prepared to defend Detroit. Brock, with characteristic vigor, at once laid his plans for its capture, though his force was much inferior in number to that under Hull. A battery was secretly erected on the Canadian side opposite the fort, and when, on the 16th of August, the British troops were ready to cross the river, the concealing trees were cut away and a destructive fire was opened upon the American position. Brock crossed with his forces, including a large number of Indians under the Shawanoe chief, Tecumseh, some distance south of Detroit. Upon his approach toward the fort he was agreeably surprised by the appearance of a messenger from Hull with an offer of capitulation. The whole territory of Michigan was included in the surrender. The American general was sent a prisoner to Montreal, and the Grand Army of the West was heard of no more for this year. Leaving Proctor (now Brigadier-General) in command at Detroit, Brock hastened back to the Niagara frontier, for there he expected the most formidable invasion.

The Niagara Frontier.—Meanwhile Sir George Prevost had learned that the British " Orders-in-Council" had been revoked before news of the declaration of war had reached England. Thinking that the war would now proceed no further, he and Dearborn arranged an armistice, and there was in consequence a cessation of hostilities until early in October. Congress, how-ever, declined to withdraw the declaration of war, and Brock prepared for a resolute defence. The delay was favorable to General Van Rensselaer, who was thus enabled to concentrate his Grand Army of the Centre upon the Niagara frontier. Brock was not idle, and from Fort George at the mouth of the river to Fort Erie at its head, every point where an invading force might land was carefully guarded.

Queenston Heights — Death of Brock, —General Van Rensselaer finally determined to attempt a landing at Queenston, opposite his own headquarters at Lewiston. Before dawn on the 13th of October a small force succeeded in landing on the Canadian


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