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HISTORY OF CANADA.   157

upon them, but were content "to speculate on the industry of the colony." The proprietors in England were able, not only to procure the disallowance of every Act passed by the island legislature to remedy the grievance, but even to secure a large abatement in the quit-rents due to the Crown. This last measure of relief turned indeed to the benefit of the island. Some of the lands, thus relieved from a heavy charge, were sold to men who honestly endeavored to bring in settlers—notably the Earl of Selkirk. Apart from the land question, the history of the island during this period is one of gradual growth through individual effort, agriculture and fishing being the chief industries.

Nova Scotia.—Sir John Wentworth was lieutenant-governor of _Nova Scotia for sixteen years (1792-1808). He seems to have held somewhat arbitrary notions, and was much opposed to public meetings. ,On one occasion (1806) he went so far as to refuse to accept the assembly's choice of a speaker, on account, it is said, of his personal dislike of the gentleman chosen. The assembly, strange to say, submitted to this encroachment upon its privileges and chose a new speaker. The loyalty of the inhabitants was conspicuously exhibited in 1793, when it was reported that a French fleet was about to make a descent upon Halifax. A numerous militia was collected with commendable celerity, and one company marched overland from Granville to Halifax 135 miles—in thirty-four hours. The alarm proved groundless, but of the spirit displayed by the young men at this juncture nothing was heard but the highest praise. Wentworth was succeeded by Sir George Prevost (1808-1811). Upon his promotion to the governorship and consequent removal to Quebec, Sir J. C. Sherbrooke became lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia. During Prevost's time the assembly showed a disposition to assert its rights against the executive, but the subjects of dispute were not of sufficient importance to call for further mention here.

The Duke of Kent.—For about five years, 1794-1799, Prince Edward, afterwards Duke of Kent, father of Queen Victoria, was in command of the troops at Halifax. During his stay he became very popular in the province, though his discipline is said to have been somewhat strict. Prince Edward Island, as already mentioned, was, in 1799, named after him. He also visited Quebec, where he publicly expressed his regret that any such


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