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156   HISTORY OF CANADA.

ericton because it was a place less exposed in case of hostile invasion and less subject also to the corrupting influence of a more populous centre. The lumber trade at once took a foremost place among the industries of the province, and, down to 1812, little is heard of New Brunswick beyond the individual experiences of the early settlers, the various changes among the officials, and the progress of the fisheries and of the lumber and shipping industries. There was one notable dispute, however, between the assembly and the council, arising out of a bill passed by the former to provide for payment of a small sessional allowance to members. The council rejected the bill, and a dead-lock was the consequence, lasting for three years (1796-1799). The assembly-men finally gained their point.

The Maine Boundary.—As already mentioned, the Treaty of Versailles (1783) fixed the River St. Croix, the scent of Champlain's first attempt at settlement, as the boundary line (in part) between Maine and the then province of Nova Scotia. There was in 1783 no river so named, and a dispute at once arose as to what stream was meant. The United States claimed the Magaguadavic as the old St. Croix ; New Brunswick upheld the claims of the Schoodic. For ten years the bickering went on, and there was some friction among the settlers around Passamaquoddy Bay. In 1794 a joint commission was agreed upon between Great Britain and the United States to settle the question, and in 1798 the decision was given in favor of the British. The Schoodic (now the St. Croix) was found to be the St. Croix of Champlain's time, and that stream to the head of its eastern branch was fixed as the dividing line between Maine and New Brunswick. The question of the further boundary to the north and as to the islands in Passamaquoddy Bay remained unsettled until later.

Prince Edward Island.--In Prince Edward Island the population was as yet small, and the action of the proprietors did not much tend to increase it. In 1779 the assembly of the island petitioned that those proprietors who had failed to perform the conditions as to settlement should forfeit their lands. From this petition it appears that twenty-three townships out of the original sixty-seven had not a single settler. On twelve others the total population was 216 souls. Spread all over the island were large tracts of wild land owned by absentees who put no settlers


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