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148   HISTORY OF CANADA.

"the very man for this country." At this time the relations between Great Britain and the United States were becoming more and more strained, the trouble finally culminating in the war of 1812. Craig, under the influence of his advisers, put no confidence in the French-Canadian population and treated all criticism of the officials as evidence of disloyalty.

Conflict with the Assembly.—To lessen the influence of the officials in the assembly, a bill was passed by that house to exclude the judges from membership, but the legislative council threw out the bill. Le Cianadien was very free in its criticism of this action, and as the speaker of the assembly was supposed to have a share in the paper, he and others were dismissed from their positions in the militia. The natural result followed. At the next election (1808) an assembly was chosen which proceeded at once to pass what was practically a vote of want of confidence in the governor's executive council. The debate is noticeable by reason of the demand then made by M. Bedard, the leader of the majority in the assembly, for an executive council which should conduct the government of the province in accordance with the views of the majority and not of the minority. Craig promptly dissolved parliament—the first instance of the exercise of this prerogative in Canada—and thus brought on a new election. As a result a still more hostile assembly confronted the governor. With a view to securing control of the officials the new assembly offered on behalf of the province to undertake the payment of the whole expense of government. Craig was somewhat at a loss how to answer this proposition. The assembly having insisted, however, upon its right to exclude the judges by its sole vote —in which it was clearly in the wrong—the governor again dissolved the assembly. He followed up tins action by closing the office of Le Canadien, and arresting Bedard, Papineau (senior), and others. This high-handed outrage was not calculated to appease the French-Canadian electors, and the elections again resulted adversely to the executive.

Moderation Counselled.—Craig apparently succeeded in giving the British ministry an unfavorable impression of Canadian loyalty, but, as the outlook toward the United States was threatening, the governor was counselled to use moderation. His action in the matter of the arrest of the French-Canadian leaders was condemned, and they were finally released without trial. Even


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