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104   HISTORY OF CANADA.

settled districts. In 1765 a further readjustment took place. The county of Cumberland, comprising the new settlements at the head of Chignecto Bay, was allowed two members, the township of Sackville in the same region was given one, while the remainder of what is now New Brunswick was made the county of Sunbury, represented by two members in the assembly.

Peaceful Progress. —The closing years of the war with France did not disturb the quiet of the Maritime Provinces. The fortress of Louisbourg was demolished (1760) and the troops there were sent to join Murray on his march up the St. Lawrence. While British armies were closing in on Montreal peaceful settlers were filling up the rich valleys which open upon the Bay of Fundy. Lawrence died in 1760. Apart from the question as to his treatment of the Acadians, his government of the province was admittedly beneficial, and it resulted in the firm establishment of British authority. From a report sent to England shortly after his death it appears that the various settlements were in a thriving condition, though dyke repairs were needed along the shores of the Bay of Fundy. A road had been opened from Halifax to the Basin of Minas which could be travelled in " an easy day's journey in the summer time." There was ship-building at Liverpool, and favorable reports had been received of the state of the fishing industry along the coasts. Education was largely in the hands of the Anglican Church. The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel sent out missionaries from England, who established private schools at various places throughout the settled districts. In 1780 the Nova Scotia assembly established and liberally endowed a public school at Halifax.

Manufactures Discouraged.—Lieut.-Governor Francklin, about the year 1766, reported that although in Nova Scotia some clothing was manufactured from wool and flax, it was only for the personal use of those who wove it. The settlers around Truro, many of whom were of McNutt's company from the north of Ireland (the home of the linen industry), still exercised their old handicraft, but very little of the product was sold, and that little only "to the neighboring towns." "This government," wrote Francklin, " has at no time given encouragement to manufactures which could interfere with those of Great Britain, nor has there been the least appearance of any association of private persons for


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