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HISTORY OF CANADA.   93

the whole, the end was sought by truly savage methods, his siege of Detroit was marked by a patient persistence unequalled in the annals of Indian warfare.

The Pontiac War—So well were Pontiac's plans laid that within six weeks after the first outbreak at Detroit early in May, 1763, of all the British posts west of the Alleghanies, Pittsburg, Detroit and those on the Niagara River alone remained untaken. From Michillimackinac in the north (where the wily red men gained access to the fort on pretence of chasing a lacrosse ball) to Fort Ligonier, on the eastern slopes of the Ohio valley, nine fortified posts in all were captured. At many of them the little garrisons were cruelly butchered. Colonel Bouquet, advancing through Pennsylvania by the route Forbes had followed five years before, was met early in August at a place known as Edgehill, or Bushy Run, near Fort Ligonier, by a savage host, whom it took him two days of hot fighting to defeat. In September, on the Niagara River, at a spot known as the "Devil's hole," near Lewiston, a provision party was attacked by a band of Senecas (the only Iroquois who took part in the uprising), and a small force which marched out from Lewiston to the rescue was ambuscaded and nearly annihilated. During the entire summer of 1763 Major Gladwyn, at Detroit, resolutely held his post against both force and guile. In the fall Pontiac made peace with him, intending, however, to renew the war in the following spring.

Early in 1764 two columns advanced into this western region, one under Bouquet by way of the Ohio, the other under Brad-street by way of the lakes. Bradstreet, on this expedition, did not add to his laurels. He failed to punish the Indians on the south shore of Lake Erie for their share in the outrages of the year before, and, contrary to his instructions, made peace with them without exacting any guarantee for their future good behavior. Bouquet, with more judgment, boldly pushed his way along the northern slopes of the Ohio valley as far as the forks of the Muskingum. Here in the very heart of the disaffected district he forced the Indians, not only to make peace, but to make it upon his terms. He exacted hostages for its observance, and secured, too, the release of a large number of white prisoners captured during many years of frontier raiding. Pontiac in vain sought aid from the French of Louisiana. A desultory war was waged


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