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92   HISTORY OF CANADA.

accustomed, they thus described this period of military occupation : " The wise and gallant general who overcame us left us in possession of our laws and customs. The free exercise of our religion was accorded us, and this was confirmed by the treaty of peace. Our old compatriots were made the judges of our civil disputes. The gratitude we feel for these favors we will transmit from age to age to our latest descendants." Of the old inhabitants few left Canada except the army and the official classes.

The Western Posts Transferred.—At this time population along the St. Lawrence practically ended at Montreal. From that point until Detroit was reached not a genuine settler could be found. Detroit and the other western posts had been included in de Vaudreuil's surrender, and Major Rogers, a noted New England ranger, was sent by Amherst to receive possession. On the south shore of Lake Erie, Rogers met the celebrated Ottawa chief, Pontiac, who questioned the right of the English to the western country, but upon this occasion he and Rogers parted amicably. Toward the end of November, 1760, Rogers reached Detroit, which its commandant gave up with very bad grace. Here a thriving settlement extended for several miles along both sides of the river below the fort. Its population Rogers placed at 2,500 ; others say it did not much exceed 1,000. Rogers also took over the posts on the Miami and Wabash, to the south-west of Detroit. Autumnal storms prevented him from reaching Michillimackinac, and this and the other north-western posts were not transferred until the following summer.

Pontiac.—The methods of the French and the British in dealing with the Indian tribes were widely different. The French treated them in the main generously, adapted themselves to the Indian mode of living, and made no attempt to despoil them of their lands. The British colonists begrudged them presents, bullied them with rough contempt, and, worst of all, sent settlers to occupy the lands which the Indians claimed as their own peculiar hunting ground. That the French king should cede their country to the English was too much to bear ; and now, when the new lords of the soil prepared to take possession, Pontiac gathered all the Algonquin tribes of the west into a fell union to drive back the invaders. From an Indian standpoint Pontiac was a distinguished patriot. His designs were far-reaching, and though, on


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