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1-IISTORI OF CANADA.   89

 

with a force of about seven thousand men. As he sa=d down the river his army was further increased from the garrisons of Three Rivers and Jacques Cartier, so that he reached Lorette toward the end of April in command of nearly ten thousand men. Murray, with more daring than prudence, advanced from Quebec to give battle. On the 28th of April, 1760, the opposing armies met at Ste. Foye, a short distance to the west of the Plains of Abraham. Murray had only about three thousand men, but his force was well supplied with artillery, and he had, besides, the advantage of position upon a rising ground. For two hours the battle was hotly contested. Murray lost the advantage of position by a too impetuous advance and was finally driven back, abandoning much artillery to the victorious enemy.

A British Fleet Relieves Quebec.--Murray at once retired into Quebec, which de Levis promptly prepared to besiege. His preparations were well advanced when, early in May, a British fleet sailed into the basin of Quebec. That much anxiety for the fate of the city had been felt within its walls is evident from the exuberance of joy with which the arrival of the fleet was hailed. As the meteor flag of Britain rose slowly to the masthead, the garrison mounted the walls and cheered for hours in the face of the disappointed foe. De Levis unwillingly raised the siege and returned again to Montreal. In July a French fleet coming to the rescue of New France was attacked by Commodore Byron in the Bay of Chaleur. The village of Petit Rochelle, under whose feeble batteries the fleet had sought shelter, was laid in ruins, and the fleet itself was entirely destroyed.

The British Close In on Montreal.—The final blow was struck with that extreme deliberation which had throughout marked Amherst's movements. Murray sailed up the river, and by the middle of August was in camp at Sorel with a force of over 3,500 men. Amherst came slowly down from Oswego with an army of about eleven thousand men. Chimney Island, below Ogdensburg, had been fortified, and the gallant Pouchot now held the post (Fort Levis) with three hundred men. Amherst would not leave it behind him untaken, and a week was spent in its capture. At length, on the 6th of September, Amherst landed his army at Lachine. General Haviland meanwhile had advanced from Crown Point with over three thousand men. De Bougain-


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