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$6   HISTORY OF CANADA.

withdrew his right wing from the position at Montmorency Falls, and the French began to think that the siege was to be abandoned. Instead, a strong body was landed behind Point Levis and sent along the south shore to join the forces above, who had been threatening Bougainville's position at Cap Rouge. Admiral Holmes was in command of the fleet above Quebec. After the troops had been taken on board he began a series of mameuvres in the neighborhood of Cap Rouge which led Bougainville to think that a serious attempt was to be made upon his batteries there. Bad weather postponed the real enterprise until the night of the 12th of September. Theii Wolfe came up to take command of it in person. About 1,600 men were put on board of boats and barges, and the little flotilla was allowed to drift quietly down with the ebbing tide. Twice as they drew near their destination they were challenged by French sentries on the shore. Twice the sentries were deceived by a Scotch officer (who spoke French fluently) into the belief that the boats were French supply-boats from beyond Cap Rouge, which, as Wolfe had learned, were expected down that night. The landing reached at length, a volunteer band under Howe climbed in silence the steep way to the top of the cliff. The guard stationed there was taken by surprise and quickly over-powered. At once those left in the boats landed and clambered up to join their comrades above. Holmes dropped down opposite the landing place, and before morning a little army of about 4,500 men had reached the heights. As day dawned they stood ready for battle on the Plains of Abraham.

The Plains of Abraham.—Admiral Saunders, the evening before, had vigorously bombarded Montcalm's camp at Beauport. Soldiers had been kept in boats, moving up and down the river in front of the French works as if in search of a good landing place. Montcalm was completely deceived as to the real point of attack. When, in the early morning, as he rode toward the St. Charles, he caught sight of the red-coats on the plains beyond the city, he knew at once that there was serious work before him. By ten o'clock, a force at least as large as that under Wolfe had gathered beyond the western walls of Quebec. Then, without waiting either for further reinforcements from beyond the St. Charles, or until Bougainville could march from Cap Rouge to attack the rear of Wolfe's army, Montcalm impetuously gave battle. The French


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