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HISTORY OF CANADA.   85

Attack on the French Camp Repulsed.—Before the end of July Wolfe had secured control of the south shore of the St. Lawrence to a point above Cap Rouge. A number of ships from the fleet had safely passed the batteries of Quebec and were now prepared to support any movement against the enemy above the city. But, beyond the capture of some prisoners on the north shore above Cap Rouge, nothing had come of the operations in that quarter. Bougainville was sent to meet the threatened danger, and from his post at Cap Rouge he guarded the northern shore as far as Quebec with tireless vigilance. Wolfe therefore determined to attack Montcalm's camp. On the last day of July, after taking every precaution, he landed a strong force on the shore in front of the French entrenchments, about a mile west of the falls of Montmorency. The detachment of grenadiers and "Royal Americans" who first landed rushed to the assault without waiting for their supports, led by Wolfe himself, to come up. The result was disastrous. The redoubts on the beach were carried with a rush, but the hot fire from the entrenchments above drove the British soldiers back just as a storm of rain burst upon the combatants. Wolfe, seeing that the attempt was now hopeless, withdrew his forces. The British loss was heavy, and Wolfe wisely forbore any further attempt upon this Beauport front.

Wolfe's Cove—August wore on, and Wolfe apparently was no nearer the capture of Quebec than when the siege began. Toward the end of the month he fell ill. His "slight carcase," as he himself once described it, had never been strong, and now the anxieties of the siege brought on a fever from which he did not recover for some days. During his illness he requested his three brigadiers, Monckton, Townshend, and Murray, to consult together as to the conduct of the siege. Upon his recovery he adopted the plan they suggested as a final attempt to capture the city. While Admiral Saunders should bombard Montcalm's camp along the Beauport front, as if to cover a landing there, the real attempt should be made up the river. If possible, a force was to be landed upon the north shore at a point about a mile west of the city, where a narrow gully led slantingly to the top of the cliff. The place was called Anse du Foulon by the French ; it is now known as Wolfe's Cove.

A Landing Effected.—Before making this last effort Wolfe


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