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HISTORY OF CANADA.   79

 

of the land forces. With him was the future hero of Quebec—James Wolfe. The Chevalier de Drucour held Louisbourg with a garrison of regulars numbering 3,800, and in the harbor was a French fleet whose fighting strength was about three thousand more. The fortress was even stronger than when Pepperrell and his New Englanders had attacked it thirteen years before. The harbor was guarded by three strong batteries as well as by the guns of the fortress itself. Wolfe led the landing party, and with slight loss the shore was gained at Freshwater Cove, some four miles west of Louisbourg. In reading the story of this siege one is struck by its likeness to the siege of 1745. Seven weeks were again spent in reducing the fortress (June 8th-July 26th). Now, however, there was more of military precision in the gradual advance of the British entrenchments closer and closer to the walls. Two of the French batteries (Grand and Lighthouse Point) which commanded the harbor were quickly captured. The third, on an island at the mouth of the harbor, was afterwards silenced by the fire from Lighthouse Point. Some of the French ships had been sunk to block the harbor's mouth. A fire broke out and destroyed others, and in the confusion British ships got in and captured the rest. A band of Canadians and Micmacs threatened the British rear, but was quickly driven back. Every sortie by the garrison was repulsed. Breaches began to appear in the walls under the constant fire of the British batteries from entrenchments close up to the fortress, and finally, on the 26th of July, Drucour capitulated. The French of the garrison were sent prisoners of war to England, and before the war closed the renowned fortress was dismantled. It long remained a valuable stone-quarry.

Further Expulsions.—With Cape Breton, Drucour surrendered Isle St. Jean, which at this time was inhabited by Acadians who had migrated during the late troublous times from the shores of the Bay of Fundy. They are described as a flourishing population of over four thousand. Lord Rollo was sent to take possession, and to drive out all who declined to take the oath of allegiance. Wolfe was sent to mete out like treatment to an Acadian settlement at Gaspe ; while Monckton, without resistance, took possession of the St. John River region in what is now New Brunswick. Much time was consumed in thus taking safe charge


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