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HISTORY OF CANADA.   73

former governor, de Vaudreuil, and by birth a Canadian. France, learning of Braddock's departure for America, sent out to Quebec with the new governor a force of three thousand regulars under Baron Dieskau to uphold her claims. It was at first intended that they should attack Oswego ; but letters found on the field after Braddock's defeat revealed the plan for Johnson's expedition against Crown Point, and Dieskau therefore was sent to meet the threatened attack in that quarter. On the British side there was much delay, as it required the action of half a dozen different colonial assemblies to get the men into the field. At length, however, Johnson found himself at the head of three thousand provincials, undisciplined, without uniforms, and provided only with a rough hunter's outfit. About three hundred Indians, chiefly Mohawks, also joined him. Advancing from Albany toward Lake Champlain, he decided after some hesitation to take the western route by way of Lake George. Leaving a portion of his force at Fort Lyman (afterwards Fort Edward) to guard his rear, Johnson advanced late in August to the southern edge of the lake.

Dieskau's Defeat.—Dieskau meanwhile had reached Crown Point with a force of over 3,500 men, regulars, Canadians, and Indians. The French leader was a veteran soldier and had a supreme contempt for the rustic warriors against whom he was sent. His policy was an aggressive one ; therefore, leaving most of his force at Crown Point, he pushed forward with about fifteen hundred men. Of these some two hundred only were regulars, the rest Canadians and Indians. They took the eastern route by way of the southern aria of Lake Champlain and Wood Creek, and thus got between Johnson and Fort Lyman. Their destination was Fort Lyman, but, learning of Johnson's camp on Lake George, Dieskau turned north to attack it. The presence of the French in the neighborhood had become known, and Johnson sent a force of one thousand men under Colonel Williams to reinforce Fort Lyman. This force marched into an ambuscade prepared for them by Dieskau. After a short conflict known as the "Bloody Morning Scout," the provincials were driven back upon Johnson's camp, which Dieskau at once-attacked. All after-noon the fight went on. The New Englanders lay close behind their defences and repulsed every attempt to take the camp. The French regulars, unused to forest warfare, suffered severely ;


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