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72   HISTORY OF CANADA.

mined that they should be given one more chance to take the oath of allegiance ; if they refused they should be removed from Nova Scotia. They did again refuse, and directions were accordingly given to carry out the decree of the council. At Annapolis, Grand Pre, Windsor and Beaubassin, nearly six thousand Acadians in all were assembled, put on board ship with such household effects as could be carried, and transported to the other British colonies. Many, however, managed to evade the troops sent to remove them. Many more afterwards succeeded in finding their way back to their old homes from the other colonies. There are to-day in the Maritime Provinces more than one hundred thousand descendants of these early French Acadians.

Lake George.—While these events were in progress at the two extremes of New France, a change had taken place in the governorship. Duquesne was replaced by the Marquis de Vaudreuil Ca,,-agnal, the last of the French governors. He was a son of the

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