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HISTORY OF CANADA.   71

 

themselves along the side of the hill which here bordered the trail by which Braddock was advancing. From among the trees which hid them from view they poured a deadly fire into the compact masses in the valley below. In whatever qualities Braddock may have been lacking, he did not want for bull-dog courage, but that very quality now stood him in had stead in fighting Indians and Frenchmen who fought like Indians. Instead of allowing his men to spread in open order among the trees, he made then keep their ranks. The British volleys buried themselves in the trees, while every shot from the hillside found its human victim. Braddock himself fell mortally wounded ; and, finally, the order to retreat was given. The retreat soon became a headlong flight. Every-thing was abandoned to the enemy, who returned in triumph to Fort Duquesne. Braddock died on the 13th, and the forlorn remnant of the British forces toiled painfully back to the eastern side of the Alleghanies.

Beausejour.—Meanwhile the campaign in Acadia had been energetically pressed. Before starting upon his own expedition against Niagara, Shirley had sent off two thousand of the New England militia to aid Monckton in his attack on Beausejour, the strongest fort in Acadia. Its defences had been strengthened by the forced labor of the expatriated settlers from the Annapolis valley, who, to the number of twelve or fifteen hundred, were now settled in the neighborhood of the French fort. Vergor, however, who was in command at Beausejour, made but a weak defence. Monckton, with his garrison of Fort Lawrence and Shirley's New Englanders, pushed the siege vigorously. A shell exploded in Vergor's quarters and in a very short time the fort capitulated. Fort Gaspereau at Baie Verte, on the gulf side of the isthmus, was also surrendered, and the fort on the St. John River was, on the advance of Captain Rolls against it, burned and abandoned.

Expulsion of the Acadians, 1755.-Acadia was now entirely in possession of the British. What was to be done with the French Acadians ? The authorities at Halifax did not, perhaps, make sufficient allowance for the influences which had been at work to draw these Acadian farmers to the side of their compatriots. Colonel Lawrence, a much less patient man than Hopson, was now at the head of affairs at Halifax. He and his council, exasperated by the conduct of the Acadians at Beausejour, deter-


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