Previous The History of the Dominion of Canada (1897) Next

 

HISTORY OF CANADA.   69

also taken to strengthen the British position. Fort Edward was built where Windsor now stands, on an arm of the Basin of Minas. At Beaubassin, Fort Lawrence was planted in spite of opposition. Here Le Louth, on the advance of the British, burned the settlers' houses and thus compelled them to move over to the north side of the Missiguash, which here enters Chignecto Bay. On this side was the French fort, Beausejour, and the Acadians were put to work to strengthen its defences. This region was all disputed territory, and there was chronic hostility between the two forts. It was here that a British officer, Howe, decoyed to the edge of the stream by a flag of truce, was treacherously shot. A French vessel, conveying supplies to the post at the mouth of the River St. John, was captured by Captain Rous, and, when France complained of this as an outrage, answer was made that the vessel had no right to trade with British territory. Colonel Hopson, whom the French authorities at the time described as a mild and peaceable officer, succeeded Cornwallis in 1752. y'

French Forts on the Ohio.—In the year 1752 Jonqui6re died at Quebec, and was succeeded by another naval officer, the Marquis Duquesne de Meneval. In spite of all the efforts of the officers at the western posts, the Indians of the Ohio region were falling more and more under the influence of the British traders from beyond the Allcghanies. Duquesne promptly determined to secure the upper valley by regular garrisoned posts. To this end he sent an imposing force of one thousand men under the able and energetic Marin, who in the last war had headed the raid on Saratoga. A fort was built at Presqu'ile, after which the portage was crossed to the head waters of the Alleghany, and other forts, Le Bceuf and Venango, were planted along its course. The British traders were driven out, and the fickle savages took note that no soldiers were sent to oppose the French. The colonial assemblies begrudged the spending of any money to secure the control of the country beyond the mountains, so that the traders were left without military support.

Fort Necessity.—Finally, however, Dinwiddie, Governor of Virginia, succeeded in getting a grant of £10,000 for an expedition to expel the French. He had previously sent Colonel George Washington with a message to Fort Le Bceuf, demanding that the French should leave the country. The messenger was hos-


Previous The History of the Dominion of Canada (1897) Next