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HISTORY OF CANADA.   b5

 

nant to France. He started again next year (1747) in command of another strong force, but off Rochelle he was met and vanquished by a British fleet under Anson and Warren. De Jonquiere being taken prisoner, the French king had to choose another governor for New France, and the Marquis de la Galissonniere was appointed.

Grand Pr6.—To aid d'Anville's campaign against Acadia, de Beauharnois sent overland from Quebec a body of men of the very pick of the Canadians, under the leadership of de Ramezay of Montreal. To prevent the Acadians from joining him, Shirley sent a small force under Colonel Noble to occupy Grand pre on the shores of the Basin of Minas. On his approach de Ramezay retired to Beaubassin, on the isthmus between Nova Scotia and the present province of New Brunswick. Noble, anticipating no attack, quartered his forces in the scattered houses around Grand Pre. De Ramezay, learning of this, planned a winter assault. After a long and tiring march around the head of the Basin of Minas, a select body under Coulon de Villiers, at night and under cover of a snow-storm, surprised the settlement. The numerical superiority of the British counted for nothing in their scattered condition. Colonel Noble was killed while fighting bravely in his nightshirt. A small body managed to hold the central block-house until daybreak; then, finding further resistance useless, they surrendered on honorable terms. They were allowed to march off to Annapolis, under promise to serve no further in the war. De Villiers retired again to Beaubassin, while Shirley sent another force to reoccupy Grand Pre.

"La Petite Guerre."—The Assembly of New York, largely under the influence of the Albany traders, was half-hearted in taking measures against Canada. The Iroquois lost much of their respect for British prowess when they saw the unguarded state of the New York frontier. The garrison at Saratoga being withdrawn, the partisan leader Marin, with a band of mission Indians, swooped down very early in the war (1745), and destroyed the fort and settlement there. At this time a young Irishman, known in Canadian history by his later title of Sir William Johnson, was stationed on the Mohawk River, where he acquired great influence with the Indians of the district. At his suggestion raids were made toward Montreal in order to draw off the bands of Canadians who


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