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HISTORY OF CANADA.   55

ing a commission as governor of Acadia in case of its capture. Subercase, in command at Port Royal, was in no position, with his garrison of less than three hundred men, to withstand the determined attack of the large force sent against him. He made, however, some show of resistance and secured honorable terms of capitulation. The capture of Port Royal, the only garrison in Acadia, meant the capture of all Acadia, which thus passed forever out of the hands of the French. Port Royal was rechristened Annapolis Royal, after the British Queen. It is known to us as Annapolis simply. Vetch was left in command of the British garrison, and the fort, though often threatened, was held through-out the remaining years of the war.

An Attack on Quebec Fails.—In Europe this war is noted for the brilliant victories of Marlborough at Blenheim, Ramilies, Oudenarde and Malplaquet. The Whigs were in power during the earlier years of the struggle, but in 1710 they were driven from office. Anxious to offset Marlborough's victories by some notable exploit under their own auspices, the new Tory ministry planned the capture of Canada. The old method of attack was again adopted—by sea upon Quebec, by land upon Montreal. Nicholson with a force of over two thousand men again took up his station at the head of Lake Champlain, ready to advance against Montreal on receiving news of the arrival of the fleet before Quebec. Sir Hovenden Walker was admiral in command of the fleet. When, toward the end of July, 1711, he sailed from Boston he had on board a force of nearly twelve thousand. General Hill, known in court circles in England as Jack Hill, brother of Mrs. Masham, the Queen's favorite, was in command of the land forces. Both admiral and general were utterly incompetent for the task they had undertaken. Through bad steering the fleet ran upon the north shore of the St. Lawrence shortly after entering the river. A number of the ships of war and transports were wrecked, and nearly a thousand men were drowned. Though the force remaining was amply sufficient to have taken Quebec, a retreat was ordered and the enterprise abandoned. Nicholson, at Wood Creek, swore roundly when he heard the news, burned his forts, and disbanded his army. Canada once more breathed freely.

The Peace of Utrecht, 1713.-The Peace of Utrecht (1713)


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