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HISTORY OF CANADA.   43

French that the governor was promptly recalled. He had actually agreed that if the Iroquois would only refrain from war upon the French, they might continue their attacks upon the western tribes.

Denonville.—Denonville, the new governor, had, therefore, as his task, to humble the Iroquois, to protect and so regain the wavering allies of the west and the north, and to oppose the English movement toward those regions. The governors of the rival colonies wrote to each other with some heat. Denonville charged Dongan with inciting the Iroquois to attack the French. Dongan denied this, but claimed the right to trade with the Indians of the upper lake region and the west. To close the pathway thither, du Luth in 1686 established a rude fort on the banks of the St. Clair, near the south end of Lake Huron.

A Raid on the Senecas.—The time had come when the Iroquois must be again vigorously dealt with, and a large force of regular troops was therefore sent out to Denonville. The wily savages could see the advantage of standing neutral between the English and the French, as by so doing they could trade with both. But their war with the western tribes was to the death, and they could not be brought to include them in any peace with the French. At this time they were engaged in exterminating the Miamis and Illinois. The tribes around Michillimackinac felt that their turn would come next, and the French leaders at the posts on the upper lakes were therefore able to induce them to join in the campaign against the Iroquois. By strange good-fortune the troops from Quebec and the Indians from the north-western posts reached on the same day (July, 1687) the rendezvous at Irondequoit Bay, near the modern city of Rochester. From this point an Indian trail led to the villages of the Senecas, the tribe which had been the most refractory. The Senecas, after a vain attempt to ambush the advancing force, abandoned their villages, which Denonville destroyed. But, as was said at the time, the wasps were not in their nests and were still left to sting. On his way to the Seneca country Denonville had been guilty of a grievous outrage upon certain neutral Iroquois living at, this time in two villages on the Bay of Quinte. Their chiefs, invited to a feast at Fort Frontenac, were there treacherously seized and tied to stakes, and the Algonquin allies of the French were allowed to torture


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