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34   HISTORY OF CANADA.

 

head of the colonial department at Versailles. He was determined to uphold the supremacy of the king's government against the

claims of the Church, and in this view his choice of Talon as intend-ant of New France was a wise one. Henceforward the right of the Church to interfere in matters purely secular was denied. Laval in one of his letters complains that the royal officers in Canada, in their zeal for material progress, were "perpetual rivals and contemners of the Church."

Laval's Educational Efforts. —Laval was earnest in his efforts

A   for the establishment of educational

TALON.   institutions, all, however, to be car-

ried on as part of the work of the Church. In 1664 he established at Quebec a seminary for the training of priests, for the education of children both French and Indian, and also for instruction in such handicrafts as were necessary in the then state of the colony. To support this seminary the system of tithes was established, and, in addition, Laval endowed it with three rich seigneuries. Out of the seminary so established has grown the well-known Laval University.

Preparations for the Iroquois Campaign.—The intendant Talon reached Canada in 1665. In that year there also arrived at Quebec the Marquis de Tracy, with an imposing force designed to put an end to Iroquois aggression. De Tracy was viceroy over all the king's North American possessions, and he brought with him the Carignan-Salieres regiment, renowned in Turkish wars. They were the first regular troops sent out to Canada. De Courcelle, the new governor, yielded place to de Tracy during the viceroy's stay in the colony, and for a time we hear little of him. De Tracy at once prepared for his Iroquois campaign. Three forts, Sorel, Chambly, and Ste. Therese, were built on the Richelieu. The first military road in Canada was laid out to connect Montreal .and Chambly. Isle aux Noix, on the Richelieu, was afterwards fortified, and remained a post of impor-

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