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HISTORY OF CANADA.   31

D'Aulnay Triumphs.—Very soon their trade rivalry became open war. D' Aulnay had the support of the French court, Ville La Tour received aid from certain Boston merchants who were interested in his fur trade. The conflict was long. The end came in 1645, when, after a vigorous defence by the gallant Lady La Tour, her husband's stronghold (Fort La Tour) at the mouth of the St. John was captured by d' Aulnay while La Tour was absent in Boston. The lustre of this achievement was tarnished by the brutal treatment of Lady La Tour, who was forced to see her garrison put to death, and, it is said, died of grief. From this time until his death by drowning in 1650, d' Aulnay was lord of all Acadia.

Acadia Captured by New Englanders.—La Tour, who since the capture of his stronghold, had been in Quebec, hastened at once to France on hearing of his rival's death. There he succeeded so well that he obtained a commission as governor and lieutenant for the king in Acadia, and he followed up this success by marrying d'Aulnay's widow. But his enjoyment of his possessions was soon rudely interrupted. In 1654 a force from Boston under Major Sedgwick captured Fort La Tour and Port Royal. There was no war between France and England at the moment ; the attack was simply the outcome of a dispute over the boundary line between Acadia and New England. Cromwell was at this time protector in England. Although the Treaty of Westminster (1655) provided for the appointment of commissioners to settle the boundary dispute, none were in fact appointed until after Charles II. came to the throne. Meanwhile Acadia was held by the English. In this crisis La Tour, with much diplomacy, became a British subject, and on the strength of his rank as a Nova Scotia baronet procured a grant of both shores of the Bay of Fundy from Lunen-burg to the St. George River in Maine. Two Englishmen, Temple and Crowne, were associated with him in this grant, and to the three a monopoly of the trade of the Bay of Fundy region was given.

Acadia Restored to France.—After much negotiation, England, by the Treaty of Breda in 1667, gave up all claim to Acadia, Charles II., in his desire to stand well with the French king, coolly sacrificing the rights of his own subjects. Temple, however, to whom the order to deliver up possession was sent,


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