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30   HISTORY OF CANADA.

 

transpiring in Acadia. After the peace of St. Germain-en-Lays (1632) the Company of New France had at once taken possession, sending out for that purpose one of their most influential members, Isaac de Razilly, a relative of the great Richelieu. With forty families, the progenitors of the French Acadians who to-day inhabit various portions of our Maritime Provinces, Razilly landed at Port Royal. The few Scotch settlers there soon became merged in the new French population. In Canada, furs were the object chiefly sought by the Hundred Associates ; in Acadia, while the fur trade was not neglected, much attention was given to the coast fisheries, and a station was established at La Heve on the Atlantic seaboard. Here indeed Razilly had designed to plant his colony, but the soil was less fertile than in the Annapolis valley, and Port Royal soon absorbed the larger part of the population.

The Two Rivals.—Besides Razilly there were in the colony two men whose later strife for leadership gives a color of romance to this period of Acadia's history—La Tour and d'Aulnay-Charnisay. Razilly was in supreme command during his life. La Tour was lieutenant for the king on the Nova Scotian side of the Bay of Fundy, while d'Aulnay held Penobscot and was in control of the' west shore of the hay. Strange to say, the Hundred Associates granted to La Tour a seigneurie, five leagues by ten, on the St. John River, in d'Auhiay's territory. On the other hand, a seigneurie, erected in La Tour's territory and comprising Port Royal, afterward became the property of d'Aulnay. A third seigneurie was granted by the Hundred Associates to Nicholas Denys, the first governor of Cape Breton, who, after an active career in Acadia, returned to France and wrote a history of the colony. His domain was to the east, along the gulf shore from Cape Canso to Gaspe.

The Champlain of Acadia.—Razilly has been called "the Champlain of Acadia." When he died in 1636, Port Royal had been re-established ; there was a trading post at La Heve and a settlement at Cape Sable (Fort St. Louis) ; d'Aulnay was in command at the fortified trading post of Penobscot ; and La Tour was living in much state upon his seigneurie at the mouth of the St. John River. Both of them were carrying on an extensive trade in furs with the Indians, the posts being admirably situated for that purpose.   4


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