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312   DAYS OF PREPARATION

gained rendered Francis Farquhar one of the best soldiers of his time, and he was besides a man by character exceptionally qualified to inspire the confidence of his subordinates.

The regiment that he was now called upon to command was absolutely unique; no similar body of experienced soldiers had ever mustered under the one regimental flag in the history of our own or any other Empire. It was a microcosm of the British Army; every regiment from the 1st Life Guards to the Departmental Corps had its representatives. The Royal Regiment of Artillery was there in all its branches; the Navy sent its quota of seamen and marines. This was no doubt a mistake and a waste of material which Canada ill could spare in view of subsequent developments, for these men were a leaven which, rightly used, would have been of vast assistance to Sir Sam Hughes in his later labours with the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

At this point, it might be well to glance at an authentic record of the composition of the famous regiment as compiled from the regimental record of enrolment on board the Royal George while the First Contingent was en route for England in October, 1914, and before the Headquarters Company had been organized.

 

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No. 1

275

211

24

26

 

9

5

275

157

272

"   2

266

142

50

26

5

35

8

266

81

147

"   3

271

173

34

12

2

39

11

229

106

165

"   4

277

160

56

26

..

20

15

271

108

155

Total.

1,089

686

164

90

7

103

39

1,041

452

739

These figures show a total of 947, or almost 87 per cent. British-born; but this is hardly to be wondered at in view of the qualifications for enlistment. Save for the sprinkling of Canadian-born South African veterans, there were few war-experienced soldiers in the Dominion; but against this, we may note that in a sense the men


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