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25 2   DAYS OF PREPARATION

is that the camp is damned cheerfully by men five hundred miles away from it, and praised highly by men on the ground! The tin-horn Napoleons say that Hughes is a fool. The soldiers say that he is a wonder." Perhaps the backward glance of History will see this remarkable figure standing on a middle ground, in lonely and pathetic splendour. One of the "pets" was Lieut.-Col. Hay, a gallant officer, now at rest in Picardy! He said that the troops when they arrived in the camp were mere levies. The hardest task was to deal with men who thought they were competent soldiers when they were raw past all imagining. Yet Col. Hay and others like him laboured incessantly, drilling by day, lecturing by night, and impressing the men with the serious, even desperate nature of the task which faced them. To such men the debt Canada owes can never be paid.

It must be remembered that if the general temper of the Camp was serious, there were contemporary events tending to make it so. On September 5th, 1914, began the Battle of the Marne; on the 7th Maubeuge was taken; on the 20th Rheims was being bombarded; on the 22nd, two days before the transports were expected to sail from Quebec the armoured cruisers Cressy, Hogue, and Aboukir were sunk by German torpedoes and the capture of Antwerp was expected at any moment. No wonder His Excellency the Governor-General said: "His Royal Highness leaves the camp with the knowledge that a fine spirit pervades these patriotic Canadians who have come forward so splendidly at this critical time."

Before the first contingent was ready to sail the country perceived that it would be only the vanguard of the force we would eventually send to the battle line. Enlistment was active in all parts of the country and winter was close at hand. Seeing that bad weather must soon render camp-life in the open impossible, the Department of Militia and Defence resolved to utilize the armouries in the various District Centres for recruiting


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