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220   DAYS OF PREPARATION

seas, both in England and France. Supplies were issued to Hospitals and. Convalescent Homes only on the indent or requisition of the commanding officer—a very necessary precaution for the safety of the goods and for the avoidance of waste, and the only piece of " red tape " attached to the issue of Red Cross goods; but even this precaution was not insisted upon in the war zone, where, in the heat of an engagement, a mere telephone message from an overtaxed dressing-station to Red Cross Headquarters sufficed to bring the necessary equipment, carried by the Society's powerful electric motor lorries. Besides the warehouses attached to the office in London, a depot for Red Cross supplies was established in the Folkestone district to serve the many Canadian hospitals and scattered patients in that part of England, while Red Cross store rooms, under special orderlies, were a part of the equipment of the hospitals we have already mentioned. In France, a depot at Boulogne with various advanced stores dependent upon it, served the needs of the Canadian military hospitals and other medical units in France, while a great baraque, built and loaned by the French Government, housed the stores for distribution to the needy hospitals of France. There is no more touching file of correspondence in the Society's archives than the letters of gratitude received from the staff and patients in these French hospitals. . "I wept when I saw the piles of sheets," wrote one superintendent; "I did not know that Canada loved France like that." The hospital at Vincennes, erected by the Canadian Red Cross as a gift to the French nation, will rank as a permanent memorial of Canada's sympathy and admiration for France in the day of her grievous visitation.

But the Society's activities were not limited to the provision of equipment and supplies and the erection of hospitals and homes. There was another and more intimate aspect to its work—more human, more affectionate. Military operations demand the subordination,


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