Previous Index Next

 

VOLUNTARY WAR RELIEF   173

Columbia, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Nova Scotia following in the order named.

 

As to the relative standing of the funds themselves, first rank in point of time and dramatic effect must be accorded the gifts of the Dominion and Provincial Governments to the Government of the United Kingdom, which followed immediately upon the declaration of war and which taken together were of a value of nearly five and a half million dollars. In point of amount, however, these stand a long way second to the Canadian Patriotic Fund contributions, which in March, 1917, had reached the large total of over twenty-five millions. In the third rank is the Canadian Red Cross fund with nearly five millions (six millions would be nearer, counting gifts in kind). To the British Red Cross over $3,700,000 have been contributed, and to Belgian Relief over $2,600,000. In round figures, the contributions to various hospitals have aggregated $2,000,000, and those to military units in one way and another about the same. But it will be well to run over in somewhat more detail these and the other funds included in the survey, noting not only the contributions that have been received by each, but the more salient features of their administration.

As above remarked, first place in any statement of the kind must be accorded to that splendid series of direct offerings which the Dominion and the Provincial Governments poured into the lap of the mother-country in the opening days of the war. The spontaneity of the act and its quality of interpreting the spirit of the time—a time when the feelings that rose highest were a passionate acquiescence in the objects of the war and the desire to place everything upon the altar of the common cause—were the features that marked it out. Naturally, when the heart of the country was so deeply stirred, something more than formal adherence to the policy of the Empire was called for. These government gifts may be regarded


Previous Index Next