Previous Index Next

 

THE ALIEN ENEMY IN CANADA 161

 

on his release. There is the administration of the fund in which his earnings or allowances have been placed. In the case of the death of a prisoner, not only must the utmost care be taken to ensure that the medical evidence is complete and in order, but there is the duty of ascertaining his next-of-kin, and even of administering his will. The possibilities of embarrassment in these and a long list of similar engagements, it will be seen, are great. Inevitably the close of the war will bring an aftermath of claims for adjustments and compensation of greater or less complexity, and the winding-up process may be as difficult as the carrying on. It is impossible, therefore, at the present stage, to write the final history of the Canadian internment operations—to do more in fact than note in a preliminary way how they were undertaken and how they met the main incidence of the task. This alone has been attempted in the foregoing, which will have sufficed to show the wide human interest of so many features of the work, the range of territory and of material which it covered, and the possibilities for evil which inexpert or hesitant treatment would have involved. It will always remain one of our most valuable experiences in the by-paths of military administration, and not the least striking incident of Canada's participation in the great war. It has even a general interest, for it has been conceived throughout in the broad spirit, so necessary to the situation in Canada, not only of meeting the military necessity, but of looking forward to the day when the people thus under restraint shall resume the purpose for which they came in the peaceful upbuilding of the country.


Previous Index Next