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158   DAYS OF PREPARATION

placed to the credit of the prisoners pending the conclusion of the war, except that a limited amount may be with-drawn for the purchase of small comforts and luxuries, canteens for the supplying of which are established in each camp.

At Camp Kapuskasing, in Ontario, the prisoners were utilized to make a clearing of one thousand acres in connection with the Experimental Farm which the Dominion Department of Agriculture is establishing at that point, whilst at Spirit Lake Camp a clearing of five hundred acres was made for a similar purpose, and a number of barns and out-buildings erected. In the Dominion Parks at Banff and Jasper, also, work of a useful nature was carried out. The German Government promptly protested through the United States Ambassador at Berlin in the case of the Kapuskasing prisoners, but it was pointed out in reply that the work in question was entirely voluntary, that it was in fact welcomed by the prisoners as a relief from the monotony of life in camp, and that as the detention of the prisoners in question was primarily to save them from cold and starvation the Government could see no reason why they should be immune from the requirements incumbent upon any one cast upon the charity of the State, and for whose support no provision had been made by the country of their allegiance. Moreover, the prisoners so employed were Austrians (with a few Turks), and not Germans, of whom only about ten were at that time employed (on a voluntary basis as cooks) throughout Canada.

There have been the usual incidents inseparable from operations which, no matter how highly organized and reduced to rule, contain a large element of the unexpected and dangerous. A prisoner on his internment must surrender every article (including money and jewelry) that might be used to facilitate an escape. In addition the most constant supervision is maintained. Nevertheless attempts to escape have occurred, not all of which


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