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132   DAYS OF PREPARATION

merely for the current consumption of her individual citizens, but for the permanent plant of her rapidly growing transportational and industrial establishments. In that decade the percentage of growth in the metal trades far exceeded that in any other department of industry; iron and steel increased 226 per cent., other metals 274 per cent., while the rate of growth in the industrial field as a whole was only 142 per cent. The textile, shoe, and furniture industries were limited in their expansion by the consumptive power of the population, and even so their growth greatly exceeded that of the population itself because the purchasing power of each human unit was much increased. But the metal industries were limited by no such consideration, for their market was supplied by the new capital which was pouring into the country, and their limit was not the amount of wealth which the Dominion could produce in a year but the amount of credit which she could procure abroad. The output of the Canadian manufacturers in 1910 was $1,166,000,000, being an excess of $685,000,000 over the previous census, and of that increase probably $300,000,000 or thereabouts was for permanent plant for the transportation system and for various industries, and less than $400,000,000 for the increased current needs of the Canadian people in their daily lives. Nor did the $300,000,000 by any means represent all that was spent in new plant in such years as 1910 and those immediately following it, for the Canadian producers were too busy to supply all the requirements of the new capital which flooded the Dominion, and large quantities of plant were imported from the United States and elsewhere.

This decade therefore saw the rise of the great structural industries in Canada—steel, cement, bridges, railway cars, roofing, rails, heavy machinery, and the like; and the fact that Canada had reached this stage of development was destined to be of the highest importance for the solution of her economic problems during the great


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