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100   DAYS OF PREPARATION

majority was in doubt, but a number of new Senators were appointed to fill the vacancies that existed, giving the Bill a comfortable majority. The vote on the second reading was 54 to 25, while on the third reading no names were recorded.

The Military Service Act, 1917, which was assented to on August 29th, made practically every male British subject in Canada between the ages of twenty and forty-five a soldier. These "soldiers" were to be absent with-out leave and without pay till called upon by proclamation. The exceptions included members of the regulars, reserve, or auxiliary forces, those serving with the navy or with the Allies, or those honourably discharged from such service, and "clergy, including members of any recognized order of an exclusively religious character, and ministers of all religious denominations existing in Canada at the date of passing of this Act."

The men liable to be called by proclamation were divided into six classes as follows:

Class 1. Those who have attained the age of twenty years and were born not earlier than the year 1883 and are unmarried, or are widowers but have no child.

Class 2. Those who have attained the age of twenty years and were born not earlier than the year 1883 and are married, or are widowers who have a child or children.

Class 3. Those who were born in the years 1876 to 1882, both inclusive, and are unmarried, or are widowers who have no child.

Class 4. Those who were born in the years 1876 to 1882, both inclusive, and are married, or are widowers who have a child or children.

Class 5. Those who were born in the years 1872 to 1875, both inclusive, and are unmarried, or are widowers who have no child.

Class 6. Those who were born in the years 1872 to 1875, both inclusive, and are married, or are widowers who have a child or children.


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