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CREATING THE CANADIAN ARMY 85

 

conflict. The atmosphere can only be obtained by appealing,through concrete means, to the sentiment and reason of the people. It was believed that the carrying on of a campaign of thrift, a campaign in relation to the saving of money and food and other matters of that kind would have the desired result. I urged when the enthusiasm of the people was apparent that a general campaign of this character should be organized and vigorously prosecuted. For reasons best known to those in authority the matter was not taken up at that time, but it was taken up later on. The results have to some extent justified the effort, late though it was. The enthusiasm of the people by that time had in some measure waned. When the cards came in arrangements were made to classify them, and the classification was carried on in a most comprehensive manner. I fancy perhaps very few people have an adequate appreciation of the work that was done. . . . The return of the cards gave the following results:

Total number of cards received    1,549,360 Divided as follows:

Viseed complete cards   1,342,755

Incomplete cards    97,640

Blank cards    108,965

Total    1,549,360

MILITARY PROSPECTS

In non-essential occupations    286,976

Farmers    183,727 Skilled shipbuilding, munition and mine

workers    4,660

 

475,363

On September 26th, 1916, the Prime Minister reported that in view of the unexpected length of the war, of the unprecedented efforts being exerted by Canada, and of the expenditure necessarily involved in the organization, maintenance, equipment, and direction of the overseas


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