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CREATING THE CANADIAN ARMY 75

 

need of men, and the personal responsibility which lay at each man's door to do his individual share of the fighting. It was found that the military authorities had indeed appointed officers for recruiting in each county, but in many cases these officers simply sat in their offices waiting for recruits to offer themselves. It became evident that . . . an active campaign of education must be entered upon. . . . A public meeting of the citizens of Halifax was held on the E2lst of July, 1915 ... and led to the formation of the Halifax Recruiting Association. . . . The campaign was opened by a great public meeting in the Armouries. . . . The movement was a success from the start; about two hundred men enlisted, and it was followed up by meetings in every part of the city and county of Halifax. The example of Halifax had the effect of arousing interest throughout the entire Province, and the Halifax Committee was asked to provide speakers for meetings all over Nova Scotia. This showed the necessity for a wider and more comprehensive organization, and at the request of the military authorities the Nova Scotia Recruiting Association was formed, with recruiting committees in practically every county. . . . The Provincial Executive keeps in touch with the county committees, and gives them all necessary assistance, supplying speakers, music, posters, etc., when asked to do so. . . . A Provincial recruiting officer was appointed, and competent officers selected for the counties, who attended the meetings of the Association, and enlisted the men who were moved by the patriotic appeals of the speakers. . . . The Association made it a point in all cases to work in co-operation with the military authorities, recognizing that recruiting is essentially the business of the Military Staff, the function of the Association being to back them up as far as possible. . . . Latterly it has become apparent that the most effective work can no longer be done by patriotic speeches, but by addressing printed appeals to young men, followed up as far as possible by personal canvass.


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