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CREATING THE CANADIAN ARMY 73

In the early days of the war recruiting had to be carried on, naturally enough, by the recruiting staffs of the active militia. After that, Headquarters ordered that the Canadian Expeditionary Force should under-take its own recruiting. Commanding officers of the overseas battalions were instructed to appoint recruiting officers and send out recruiting sergeants, each in his own territory. Civilian efforts were encouraged. Patriotic meetings were held at various centres, attractive programmes including music and songs were prepared, and good speakers were invited to forward the cause. The best and most effective work was done and the highest enthusiasm excited by the men who had actually been at the Front and could speak from personal experience. But by degrees it was found that the existing machinery was cumbersome and inefficient, and its results hardly commensurate to the effort and expense which had been dedicated to it by private organizations.

Sir Thomas Tait, President of the Citizens' Recruiting Association of Military Division No. 4, Montreal, in his report on the work of this body mentions that private citizens responded generously to their appeals for funds, office room, stationery, etc. "Meetings were organized in every part of the Division . . . the pulpits of nearly all the churches were thrown open to our speakers, and many addresses were given at moving-picture entertainments ... noon hour meetings were held in all the principal labour establishments.... Recruiting appeals were made also by means of pamphlets, of which nearly 300,000 were sent by mail to the country districts, or distributed by hand throughout the city. Posters and streamers were also issued. .. . Placards were placed in many industrial establishments announcing that positions would be held open for men joining the overseas forces. . . . We also circularized employers of labour asking them for the names of employees who might be considered fit for service, and as a result we came into possession of the names of nearly 10,000 men. . . . It will be seen


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