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CANADA AT WAR   45

was the desire to stimulate recruiting in Quebec; but there was more than this. There remained to be considered the relations between French Canadians and other Canadians in the period after the war, the period of nation-building, in which the vast areas of Canada were to be gradually settled and occupied by perhaps fifty million people. A quarrel between two sections of the people would prevent co-operation and imperil the future. The leaders of the movement resolved not only to try to prevent this calamity, but to seize the occasion to lay the foundations for a permanent good under-standing. They laid out the plan on broad, simple lines. The danger lay in lack of knowledge, and this again was due to the lack of intercourse between the two peoples. A visit of a group of Ontario business and professional men to Quebec was the occasion of some very gratifying expressions of good-will on both sides. Prejudices and misunderstandings disappeared in a surprising manner. Superficially, these seemed to be only a series of social gatherings. But beneath this there was the serious purpose of fostering unity and patriotic sentiment and of removing a formidable obstacle to Canadian progress.

From the opening of the war until near the close of 1916, the office of Minister of Militia and Defence for Canada was held by Lieutenant-General Sir Sam Hughes, to give him his present title. His administration was constantly under fire, and was the subject of violent controversy. It would be out of place to review every matter of controversy in these pages, or to attempt to pronounce a final judgment on his record. He was an enthusiastic soldier, had taken part in the South African War, and had acquired considerable knowledge of military affairs. He is a man of abounding energy and courage, impulsive, fond of expressing himself in public, frank and brusque in his manner. It would be unfair to deny him a large share of the credit for the achievements of the first two years of the war, the raising of forces far beyond


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