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40   DAYS OF PREPARATION

back, who were called "shirkers" and "slackers." Then it began to be said that some men or elements of the community were doing more than their share, and some less.

In June, 1916, an analysis of recruiting was made by a committee of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association. This committee pointed out that in the early stage of the war, when small forces were raised hastily, the enlistments included many unemployed men, whose withdrawal did not greatly disturb economic life. But when the standard was raised first to 250,060 and then to 500,000 a serious disorganization of industry was threatened. Business concerns, said the committee, lost highly skilled employes, difficult to replace; and as the enlistment of married men was disproportionately large, their families became a charge upon the country, requiring the expenditure of immense sums in separation and patriotic fund allowances.

The figures of recruiting up to May 31st, 1916, were analyzed according to locality, occupation, and birth. The quota due by each district according to population in order to produce 500,000 men was compared with the actual enlistment.

Quota

Enlistment

Western Ontario    44,000

28,000

Toronto   86,000

70,000

Eastern Ontario   53,000

34,915

Quebec   109,000

34,903

Maritime (Atlantic) Provinces   65,000

31,061

Saskatchewan    

Manitoba    

Extreme Western Ontario (west of

60,000

68,888

Lake Superior) and Keewatin   

British Columbia   

27,000

30,709

Alberta    26,000

30,157

According to birth, the figures showed

a large pre-

ponderance of recruits born in the United Kingdom, 180,000, or sixty per cent. The Canadian-born recruits


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