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12   DAYS OF PREPARATION

word and battle cry. More wonderful than Whitefield's pronunciation of that "blessed word Mesopotamia" was the frenzied adulation of the "Deutschland" to be, after the "Day" had come and gone. The power of the League was irresistible. It set up and hurled down politicians, triumphed over parties, rebuked even "Divine Majesty" in no measured terms when it did not walk in its ways. Henceforward German policy changed in its relation to the outer world. Bismarck had counselled Russian friendship, and had even entered into alliance with the Bear, but the new Germany reversed this, and allowed the defensive pact to lapse. The result was that France and Russia drew more closely together, until, from an understanding, a treaty for mutual defence was signed. In 1896, the new policy of the German Colonial Expansionists began, and, with this, the next step in national evolution was taken.

At first the new movement contented itself with demanding "compensations" when other Powers developed their colonial possessions, and discovering "interests" where none had been suspected before. In 1897, and again in 1900, the Kaiser's mailed-fist policy toward China drew the attention of the world to the new departure. An extremely ostentatious friendship for unsavory Turkey first amused, and then interested international onlookers. The Berliner, who did not have a single Mohammedan subject throughout his realm, gratuitously constituted himself Protector of the Mohammedan world. His effusive sympathy with the Boer Republics, in their trouble with Great Britain, opened eyes in England that had long blinked sleepily and charitably. Then came the Bagdad Railway project. All which served to illustrate the changed German attitude toward the outer world. In Africa began a policy of sword-rattling that was clearly intended to intimidate France, and compel Great Britain to exhibit the degree of her friend-ship for her neighbour across Dover Strait. In 1904, Great Britain and France had gone over their books


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