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UPPER CANADIAN REBELLION, 1837–38 219

 

ed on old Fort Malden, and the third placed on board a schooner fitted up by Captain Vidal, R.N., of Sarnia. Altogether some 3,500 militia and volunteers, including 650 picked men under "Tiger" Dunlop, a force of cavalry under Askin and Hamilton, and 200 warriors of the Six Nations under Colonel Clench, kept watch night and day along the western frontier.

On the 27th of January, the United States Government, awakened at last to a sense of its responsibilities, sent General Winfield Scott with 300 regulars to preserve the country's neutrality along the Michigan boundary. Finding themselves thus between two fires, Sutherland and his Army of Liberation returned to their civil occupations, if they had any.

Mackenzie was not at all discouraged. He had succeeded in arousing the interest of a large number of Americans, many of whom sincerely believed that by joining the invading armies they would be releasing from British tyranny the down-trodden people of Canada. So-called Hunter's Lodges were formed all over the Northern States, money was provided for arms, equipment, and supplies, and the leaders prepared an elaborate scheme of invasion by which Canada would be attacked simultaneously at so many scattered points that success seemed beyond reasonable question. It has already been seen how the attacks directed against the Lower Canadian border came to naught. The invasion of Upper Canada proved equally futile. As a matter of fact the "Patriots," though amply supplied with the sinews of war, lacked a brain to direct their movements and inspire them in attack. None of their leaders apparently possessed sufficient genius to weld their loose organization into a real fighting force, or to work out a plan of campaign that offered any prospect of ultimate success. It was fortunate enough for Canada that this was the case, as both in Upper and Lower Canada there were still numbers of disaffected who only awaited an initial success of the invaders to join their cause.


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