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206   MILITARY HISTORY OF CANADA

on November 7th, about 500 rebels attacked the old mill at Lacolle, near Lake Champlain. The post was defended by a party of volunteers under Major Schriver. The rebels were utterly defeated, eleven killed and eight taken prisoner, the rest escaping across the boundary. Two volunteers were killed and one wounded.

Two days later Robert Nelson with force of 1,000 men, armed partly with muskets and partly with pikes and swords, marched against Odelltown, which was defended by about two hundred volunteers. The volunteers were completely surrounded, but gave such a good account of themselves that Nelson retreated, leaving fifty dead on the field. Of the volunteers six were killed and ten wounded.

The main body of the insurgents had gathered at Napierville, some four thousand strong. On November 9th, Sir James Macdonell marched against them with a strong force of infantry and cavalry and twelve field-pieces. The insurgents did not wait to be attacked, but took to their heels. The same day another body of rebels at Beauharnois was attacked and dispersed by the Glengarry Volunteers, 1,000 strong, with 120 men of the 71st and 22 of the Royal Sappers and Miners, the whole under Colonel Carmichael. With the exception of an incipient rising at Boucherville, quickly suppressed, the rebellion in Lower Canada had now ended. The Montreal gaol was again filled to overflowing with rebel prisoners; Colborne had taken decisive measures to check any further attempts on the part of Patriotes; and the army of American sympathisers had come to the reluctant conclusion that Canada was too hot a chestnut to pull out of the fire.


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