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190   MILITARY -HISTORY OF CANADA

threatened by Brown's army and was again retiring to-wards Fort George. Drummond saw that a battle was inevitable and that the hill at Lundy's Lane would be the centre of action. He at once rushed to this spot, and, anticipating the Americans, seized the hill. The enemy were rapidly approaching from Chippawa. At 6 p.m. on the 25th, the famous Battle of Lundy's Lane began by the Americans delivering an attack upon the British line, composed of the 89th, the 1st Royal Scots, the 8th Kings, and some of the 41st. These troops, with two field-guns of the Royal Artillery, held the crest of the hill, which the enemy assailed repeatedly, and were as often driven back, leaving the ground strewn with dead and dying. At an anxious moment, Colonel Hercules Scott arrived with the 103rd and detachments of the 8th and 104th, together with about 300 of the sedentary militia and two 6-pounders. They had taken a wrong road, and had marched over twenty miles in a broiling sun, but were still eager for fight. The enemy, who also received reinforcements, showed great courage and discipline and charged up the fatal hill again and again, only, to be driven back by the bullets and bayonets of the British. In one charge they bayoneted the British gunners in the act of loading, and momentarily gained possession of the guns. Night had fallen, pitch-dark night, but the storm of battle, the flashing of cannon and musketry, raged along the heights. The muzzles of the opposing cannon were within a few yards of each other, and the combatants were so mingled in close fight, that, in limbering up the guns, an American 6-pounder was put by mistake on a British limber, and a British 6-pounder on an American one.

Colonel Scott on his arrival had plunged at once into the thick of the fight. The enemy at that moment made their last and supreme effort. They massed their columns under Colonel Miller and threw them madly against the lines of the British; but in vain. Their generals—Brown, Ripley, and Scott—were all wounded and had been carried off the field. On the British side General Riall


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