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THE WAR OF 1812   179

the shelter of abattis. The United States soldiers believed that they had already won a victory, and advanced against de Salaberry's main position. The sharp fire and the large army intimidated the inexperienced voltigeurs, and they hastily retreated. But de Salaberry stood his ground, and, it is said, held his bugler in a firm grip, compelling the trembling lad to sound "the advance." The notes came as a cry of defiance to Izard's men, who were shouting vociferously at the easy beating they had given the voltigeurs. Lieut.-Col. Macdonell realized the meaning of "the advance," and sent forward two companies to his commander's support, while a number of his buglers sounded the advance over a wide front. The United States soldiers had not learned of Macdonell's arrival and thought that de Salaberry's 300 were all they would have to contend with at this point. They were astounded at the numerous bugle calls that apparently denoted a large army. The fifty Indians under Lamothe added to their alarm by blood-curdling cries. The Indians were ever a source of dread to the United States soldiers, and Izard paused to reconnoitre and await news of Purdy and his men. The voltigeurs had meanwhile taken heart and returned to their position, Macdonell with his 600 continued the warlike clamour, and the enemy, losing heart and fearing to lose their scalps, fled from the field. They were followed by an effective musketry fire from the companies under Captains Jean Baptiste Duchesnay and Juchereau Duchesnay.

Purdy had worn out his troops seeking the ford, and was too late in arriving at the scene of conflict. As he advanced along the south bank of the river he was at-tacked by Captain Bruyere, with some sixty Chateauguay chasseurs, but these he easily drove before him. Meanwhile Macdonell had sent a company under Captain Daly across the river to check Purdy's advance. As the United States' troops came into view this light company poured a well-aimed volley into them at close range. The British fire was answered by a terrific fusilade, but, in


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