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162 MILITARY HISTORY OF CANADA

 

The Americans, though taken by surprise, had, owing to Procter's mode of attack, ample time to prepare for de-fence. A strong force took up a position within the picket fence, and resting their weapons on the earthworks poured a heavy fire into the artillery. They were excellent marksmen, and the artillery and the 41st supporting the guns received severe punishment. For an hour this long range battle continued, and in that time the 41st alone lost fifteen killed and ninety-seven wounded.

Meanwhile the Indians and the militia on the left had been charging the American right, and had forced Colonel Well's regiment to give way before them; though Colonel Allen brought his men to the rescue, the entire American right was soon driven back. Across the frozen river they fled, a terrified mob pursued by a yelling horde of Indians. Colonel Allen, Colonel Wells, and Colonel Lewis were driven along with the crowd. Colonel Winchester, who apparently had never crossed the river, and his young son, a lad of sixteen, were caught in a mass of fleeing men and borne helplessly along. The Kentuckians, plunging through deep snow that made rapid or prolonged flight impossible, were given no quarter by the Indians, but were ruthlessly smitten down and scalped. Allen was killed, Winchester and his son and Colonel Lewis were captured. Fortunately Winchester fell into the hands of Roundhead, or he would probably have lost his life in the general massacre.

The American left wing was now likewise turned, and the entire force remaining on the north side took up a position behind the picket fence, where Major Madison encouraged them to make a last heroic stand. They expected no quarter from the Indians, and were going to ask for none. The guns were once more playing upon them, and they were suffering from concentrated musketry fire in their front, their left, and their right, but they returned this with interest, taking heavy toll from their foe. Meanwhile Winchester was brought to Procter; he saw that the day was lost, and that it was useless for his


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