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THE WAR OF 1812   151

military force to attack Sackett's Harbour while the United States fleet was absent at Fort George. The force consisted of five armed vessels, including the Wolfe and Royal George of twenty guns each, and carried a land force of 750 men. On the morning of the 29th, a landing at Horse Island was effected under a heavy fire by the troops under Colonel Baynes. A causeway connecting the island with the mainland was forced with great gallantry, and an American 6-pounder captured. The enemy occupied a thick wood; the British gun-boats fired into the wood; but their opponents, being secure behind large trees, were only to be dislodged with the bayonet. The spirited advance of a section of the invading force with fixed bayonets drove the enemy from the wood to their block-house and forts; at the same time, their naval storehouse in the vicinity of the fort was set on fire, as were also a frigate on the stocks, two shipsof-war in the harbour, and the stockaded barrack. With complete victory in sight Baynes and Prevost, having no artillery, refrained from attacking the fort, and ordered the withdrawal of the troops to the boats. The force then re-embarked, leaving several wounded officers and soldiers to fall into the hands of the enemy—an ending most disgraceful to the British commanders.

Early in June, part of the force which had been engaged at Sackett's Harbour embarked at Kingston, on board Sir James Yeo's squadron, to reinforce the British troops under Vincent. News of the evacuation of Fort George having arrived, Yeo received directions to land the men as near York as possible; but the fleet being detained at Kingston by contrary winds, Major Evans and Lieutenant Finch of the 8th Regiment travelled by land to York, which the enemy had evacuated. Evans, hearing of the gallant affair at Stoney Creek, returned to the fleet, and induced Sir James Yeo to attack the invaders' camp at Forty Mile Creek, while Finch proceeded by land to Burlington to apprise Vincent of the approach of the fleet and troops. A combined movement was arranged, and the enemy,


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