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104   MILITARY HISTORY OF CANADA

liminary condition, they would, within twelve days, deliver up to him every French and English prisoner in their hands—men, women, and children—and furnish them with food, clothing, and horses to convey them to Fort Pitt. So sternly did Bouquet insist upon these conditions, that in a few days he received no fewer than 200 captives, taken by the Indians from English and French settlements in Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York, and Canada. The Delawares meekly agreed to all his terms and in the main lived up to their promises.

Pontiac, however, was still on the war path, and it became necessary to despatch troops from Canada to help wind up the war. The British authorities, recalling the splendid service the Canadians had rendered the French armies as bush-fighters and voyageurs, determined to enrol a Canadian detachment. Moreover, such a force in the field would have a disheartening effect upon the Indians, who had professedly taken up arms in the interest of their allies the French. On March 5th, 1764, General James Murray wrote to Lord Halifax that he had made a requisition for 300 Canadians to serve in the approaching campaign. He was strongly of opinion that the whole number should, and could, be raised by voluntary enlistment, and hoped to be able to prevent the Lieutenant-Governors of Montreal and Three Rivers from putting the draft into force. Proclamations were prepared setting forth the terms of service, and expressing a wish that all the men should be raised according to them. One of these proclamations issued by Governor Haldimand at Three Rivers, and addressed to "All the Captains of Militia," explained that the Government had resolved upon adding five companies of Canadians to the troops to be engaged in the campaign against the Indians, these companies to comprise sixty men each. Two were to be raised in the Government of Quebec, two in that of Montreal, and one in that of Three Rivers, and all five were to be under the command of Canadian officers. Only those who, of their own free will, were determined to become subjects of


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