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98   MILITARY HISTORY OF CANADA

right he had advanced through his territory with a hostile band. After mutual explanations, Pontiac allowed him to continue on his journey; but the chief evidently felt that in the fall of French authority at Quebec fell also that Indian balance of power between the two great nations who had been contending for supremacy on this continent. Detroit and the forts in its neighbourhood were taken over by Rogers, but on account of the lateness of the season he could not reach the posts on Lake Huron and Michigan, and these remained in the hands of the French until the following year. About the end of December Rogers left Detroit and went to Fort Pitt.

New France was no more; but the chivalry which had been transplanted from La Belle France to the banks of the St. Lawrence survived, and still lives. The language, the daring, the love of kindred and race, the devout religious spirit, the best things for which the Fleur-de-Lis stood, exist to-day in the country which Champlain nursed into being, which brave old Frontenac held secure, and which the chivalrous Montcalm and Levis strove so valiantly, so gloriously, but so vainly to defend. History presents many striking spectacles; but few so remarkable as the one we have forcibly impressed upon our minds in the years of stress and bloodshed through which we are now (1917) passing, by the presence of a great Canadian army "somewhere in France," in which, under the Union Jack, descendants of men who fought under Abercromby, Amherst, and Wolfe are fighting shoulder to shoulder with the descendants of those who served under Drucour, Montcalm, and Levis.


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